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Discussion: Complete The “Bipolar And Depressive Disorders” Chart.

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Discussion: Complete The “Bipolar And Depressive Disorders” Chart.

Discussion: Complete The “Bipolar And Depressive Disorders” Chart.

Although bipolar and depressive disorders share several key similarities, some aspects are radically different among these disorders. The completion of this chart gives you an opportunity to thoroughly compare and contrast these specific disorders. Complete the table below by following the example provided for Cyclothymic Disorder. Include examples and at least two scholarly references as reference notes below the chart.

  • attachmentCNL-605-RS-T4BipolarandDepressiveDisordersComparisonChart.docx
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CNL-605 Topic 4: Bipolar and Depressive Disorders Comparison Chart

Directions: Although bipolar and depressive disorders share several key similarities, some aspects are radically different among these disorders. The completion of this chart gives you an opportunity to thoroughly compare and contrast these specific disorders. Complete the table below by following the example provided for Cyclothymic Disorder. Include examples and at least two scholarly references as reference notes below the chart.

Note: “D/O” is an acronym for disorder

Disorder and FeaturesDepressive Episode?Manic Episode?Hypomanic Episode?Duration of Clinically-Significant SymptomsDuration of Symptom-Free IntervalsDistinguish From (Differential Diagnosis):Comorbidity (Often Seen With):
Cyclothymic DisorderNo, but episodes only that do not meet full criteriaNoNo, but episodes only that do not meet full criteria2+ yr. in Adults1+ yr. in AdolescentsNo longer than 2 monthsPsychotic D/OBipolar D/OBorderline PDSubstance-Induced D/OSubstance-Related D/OSleep D/OADHD
MDDMajor Depressive Disorder         
Dysthymia Persistent Depressive Disorder       
DMDDDisruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder       
Bipolar I Disorder        
Bipolar II Disorder        

References

© 2019. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved.

© 2019. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved.

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